Before It Happens:

If your pet(s) are outside at all they need to have on a collar and tag. This is their best ticket home. A collar without a tag is useless in helping your pet find his way home. Microchips are inexpensive and highly effective. They provide a means of identifying your pet that is nation-wide. Most vets and shelters have the ability to check for a microchip, and then call for the owner information. A dog or cat may lose a collar with tags, but not a microchip. Microchips are the size of a piece of rice, and are implanted under the skin by your vet.  Microchips only work if you have registered and keep your information current with the microchip company data base.

For All Your Animals:

  • Keep current I.D. photos of each of your animals, front and side.
  • Write down detailed physical descriptions of your animals including eye color and distinguishing characteristics. Keep it on hand.
  • Keep tags on your animals at all times as required by law.
  • Write your address and phone number on their collars with an indelible ink marker.
  • Keep a copy of your micro-chip and / or your rabies and city license tag numbers.
  • If leaving your animal in the care of others, seriously consider your choice of caretaker. Provide them with the relevant information as described above. Consider professional kenneling.

 

When You Lose a Pet

When your beloved dog or cat strays from home, it can be a traumatic experience for both of you. Here are some tips that we hope will help you find your pet. Contact local animal shelters and animal control agencies: File a lost pet report with every shelter within a 60-mile radius of your home and visit the nearest shelters daily, if possible. In Siskiyou County we recommend filing a report with your local Police Department as well for some times their animal control officers are also community service officers. See below for a  list of local agencies in Siskiyou County. If microchipped: If your pet is microchipped, call the Microchip Registry or log on to their website to confirm that your contact information is up-to-date. Be sure to alert them that your pet is missing. Social Media: Post on Craigs List, Facebook and Twitter.  Many people post lost and found animals using the social media.

Siskiyou County Animal Control
Animal Shelter
525 Foothill Drive • Yreka, CA 96097
Phone: 530-841-4028

Dunsmuir Animal Control
City Hall
Phone: 530-235-4822 Ext.102

Mount Shasta Animal Control
Mount Shasta Police Department
Phone: 530-926-7540

Lake Shastina Community Services
Phone: 530-938-4113

Weed Animal Control
Weed Police Department
Phone: 530-938-5000

City Of Yreka Animal Control
Phone: 530-841-2300

Shasta County Animal Control
Phone: 530-245-6065

ADDITIONAL TIPS FOR FINDING A LOST DOG

  • Search your neighborhood both on foot and by car. Dogs are crepuscular, meaning they’re most active at dawn and dusk. Search at other times as well, but focus on those two time periods. Cover the paths where you normally walk your dog, as well as surrounding areas. Draw a circle on a map with your home at the center. Extend the radius out a few miles so you can cover the area in a comprehensive, methodical way.
  • Grab a leash, and take along some really stinky, yummy food you know your dog will love. If your dog has a favorite toy, bring that along as well. Toys that make noise, such as ones that squeak or jingle, are best. Whether you’re walking or driving, go slowly and shout out your dog’s name in a happy voice. (If you’re in a vehicle, having someone else drive so you’re free to shout out the window is advised). Assuming your dog is familiar with the phrase, “Wanna go for a ride?” say your dog’s name followed the phrase, uttered in the same tone you’d normally use. If your dog is trained to come when called, try calling their name and then giving the recall cue, also using the tone you’d normally use for the exercise.
  • If you have another dog, or have access to another dog yours is friends with, take that dog along on searches.   Leave articles of your clothing or your dogs bedding nearby where he was last seen.
  • Bring a photo with you, and show it to everyone you pass. (If your dog is not currently lost, be sure to have a photo handy on your cell phone or printed out, just in case. You might also need it to claim your dog if he’s ever impounded at a shelter or humane society.)
  • If your dog is not friendly with people, you can’t very well ask anyone to try to contain him; in that case, give out the number of your local animal control agency, and your cell number, and ask people to call immediately if they spot your dog. Even if your dog is people-friendly, tell people that if they do see him, not to chase him. Ask that they turn their body to the side (and even crouch down with the body turned sideways) and clap gently, using a happy voice to lure your dog to them. Ask that if they have a yard or other containment area, to coax your dog inside and then call you. Let people know if your dog is dog-friendly, in case they have a dog of their own. And if your offering don’t forget to mention the reward; positive reinforcement works for people, too.
  • Be sure all of your neighbors are aware of the situation. If you feel it’s safe, knock on doors in your area, explain the situation, and leave people with a flyer.   If someone is not home re-visit them later, they may have seen your dog earlier or have some type of information that could lead you to your dog.
  • Post “Lost” flyers all around your neighborhood, using the map you marked up as a guide. Don’t crowd the flyer with text, as it should be easily readable by passing drivers. Include a photo, preferably in color. If you are offering a reward make sure the word “REWARD” is in very large letters.  It’s also a good idea to add the phrase, “Needs medication.” This not only imparts a sense of urgency, but dissuades those who might believe in a “Finders, Keepers” policy from “adopting” your dog. It’s best to have small tear-off tags with your phone number at the bottom of the flyer, so that people take a tag rather than tearing down the entire flyer.
  • Place a Lost Dog ad in your local papers, and be sure to search daily through the Found ads. Do the same for Craig’s List online, and any other classifieds sites local to your area.
  • Give flyers to your local postal workers, and delivery drivers for services like UPS and FedEx. They’re the ones who are all over your neighborhood daily, so they have the best chance of spotting your dog. Give flyers to kids who are playing out in the street, and make sure they know there’s a reward. Alert local pet sitters, since they too are out and about in the community, and normally have other dogs with them that might attract your dog. Give flyers to anyone you can think of who spends time around your neighborhood—bus drivers, highway workers, utility workers, etc. Tell local trainers too, in case someone decides to keep your dog and then get him trained. The more people you tell, the better the chance someone will call you when your dog is spotted.
  • Post flyers at your local veterinary offices, emergency clinics, shelters, humane societies, groomers, pet supply stores, kennels, any other dog-related businesses, and dog parks. Post too at laundromats, supermarkets, community bulletin boards, and anywhere else that will allow it.
  • Spread the virtual word! Share your information on social media such as Twitter and Facebook. Be sure to include a photo.
  • Let local rescue groups know, too. If your dog is purebred, someone might try to turn him in to the breed rescue group rather than dropping him off at a shelter. Even if he’s a mixed breed, make sure local rescue groups have your phone number and a description/photo of your dog. Search your local shelter, and any that are within roaming distance, daily. Don’t just call—you must show up in person
  • While at the shelter, have them double check the “found”  postings. Someone might have your dog at home and doesn’t want to turn him in.
  • Search all of the places you can think of that a dog might find attractive. Local dog parks, fields that contain rabbits or squirrels, woods, garbage dumps, and dumpsters behind restaurants are all good bets. When you search on foot, be sure to keep an eye on bushes and under cars, as those are common hiding places for a frightened dog, or one who is napping.
  • There are companies that will, for a fee, search for your dog by generating flyers and employing a voluminous contact list. This can be especially helpful if you work full time or are otherwise too busy to conduct a full-on search effort on your own.
  • If your dog was hit by a car or otherwise injured, he may have been taken to a local veterinarian.
  •  This one might seem odd to some, but you might contact a pet psychic. Yes, there are many…let’s say, “non-talented” folks out there calling themselves psychics. But some are talented enough that they can at least let you know the type of setting where they “see” the dog, which could provide the clue that helps you to find him.
  •  If you spot your dog on the street, be sure to follow the body language suggested in point #5. You could even try running the other way, encouraging him in a happy voice to chase you, until you get the chance to put a leash on him.
  • Think positive. Visualize your dog home safe and sound. Most importantly, don’t give up! I know of a few cases where a dog was lost, and someone took the dog in for a few months and then gave it up to a shelter. Keep looking; organization, hope, and perseverance are the most valuable tools you have. Here’s to your dog getting home safe and sound.